Innisfree Gardens

If youare looking for a day trip or weekend getaway, surrounded themselves bynature, the Innisfree Gardens offers a serenely magical hold on those lucky enough to explore its fairy-tale like grounds. Like a picture in a dream – the fact that these remarkable gardens are real is what makes the Innisfree Gardens so spectacular. As you explore the sloping green hills surrounded by the glacial and iridescent40-acre Tyrrell Lake, you can’t help be taken in by its beauty, says Brad Reifler. The lake itself is filled from water pumped from a hillside reservoir. A complex system of underground pipes takes this water to various parts of the garden to be used not only for irrigation for plant life but for the garden’s lovely streams and waterfalls.

Visitors to Innisfree Gardens can walk through public gardens (which at 150 acres may not be possible in one visit) in which the “…ancient art of Chinese landscape design has been reinterpreted to create, without recourse to imitation, a unique American garden…” according to the InnisfreeGarden website.As guests encounter rushing waterfalls, bustling streams, retaining walls and long green lawns and views of the lake, guests should know that while everything is natural there is nothing by accident.

The gardens are set “…into a series of episodes or pictures and guests can enter the sequence of pictures wherever they choose. The rugged topography of the Innisfree site invariably enframes these pictures called cup gardens,” according to the Innisfree Garden website and brochures.

The gardens are home to a number of flora and fauna. Depending on the time of year, visitors will be treated to a variety of lush flowers. For June visitors, they will delight in the climbing Hydrangea and Peonies. Come in July through September and you will see the legendary Lotus. In addition to the wondrous plant life, the gardens also take care to offer visitors fantastical views of both the lakes and the gardens as places for quiet contemplation, notes Brad Reifler. You can gaze at The Point, A Terrace Bed, as well as modern-day Water Sculpture to enhance the natural beauty of the gardens.

In the early 1930s, theInnisfree Gardens were once private and belonged to Walter and Marion Beck. The garden was then put into the stewardship of landscape architect Lester Collins, and eventually opened the garden to the public.

Admission to the Innisfree Gardens is only $4 per person (four years and older)on Wednesdays through Fridays, with a $5 price tag for those four years and older on the weekends. The gardens are closed Mondays and Tuesdays. You may visit the gardens from May through October as it closes down during the cold winterseason, says Brad Reifler.